According to The History Channel: “Jacob Davis, a tailor in Reno, Nevada, was one of Levi Strauss’ regular customers. In 1872, he wrote a letter to Strauss about his method of making work pants with metal rivets on the stress points– at the corners of the pockets and the base of the button fly– to make them stronger. As Davis didn’t have the money for the necessary paperwork, he suggested that Strauss provide the funds and that the two men get the patent together. Strauss agreed enthusiastically, and the patent for “Improvement in Fastening Pocket-Openings”– the innovation that would produce blue jeans as we know them– was granted to both men on May 20, 1873.”

Bishop Mark Brennan closed our churches to the public celebration of the Mass out of a well-founded concern to keep people from spreading or catching the Coronavirus.  It seems to have been a wise choice when it was learned that people could unknowingly pass on Covid-19 without any symptoms.  Beginning this weekend the lockdown is lessening.  However this unbuttoning comes with severe restrictions and limitations.  Far fewer seats, required masks and sanitized hands, assigned seating, single lines with properly distanced communicants, etc.  Letters were mailed to registered parishioners on Monday, and can also be found here and on our website.

Saint Francis de Sales Church will be open for Mass on Saturday at 5pm on MAY 23 and ONE Mass on Sunday at 10:00 am on May 24.   (NOTE THE TIME CHANGE.)  The Front doors and the parking lot doors will open 30 minutes early. There is no standing room.  Once all the seats are filled, state law requires us to turn people away.

 

🛑    🚫             🛑    🚫             🆘    🆘             🚫    🛑             🚫    🛑

 

Just to make clear my thoughts, as a sometimes and more frequently cantankerous, crotchety, curmudgeonly, contrary, cross, crusty and cranky cleric conveniently clear:

EVERYONE AGE 65 or OLDER, THOSE with ANY SERIOUS MEDICAL CONDITIONS such as DIABETES, HEART CONDITION, COMPROMISED IMMUNITY, or a LUNG CONDITION SHOULD STAY AT HOME.  ANYONE WORRIED about possibly SPREADING or CATCHING the CORONAVIRUS, should NOT come.

 

🛑    🚫             🛑    🚫             🆘    🆘             🚫    🛑             🚫    🛑

 

SELECTED SCRIPTURE VERSES for reflection and prayer:

 

Wait for the Lord; Be strong and let your heart take courage; Yes, wait for the Lord.           (Psalm 27:14)

 

But as for me, I will watch expectantly for the Lord; I will wait for the God of my salvation. My God will hear me.        (Micah 7:7)

 

Therefore be patient until the coming of the Lord. The farmer waits for the precious produce of the soil, being patient about it, until it gets the early and late rains. You too be patient; strengthen your hearts, for the coming of the Lord is near.         (James 5:7-8)

 

POEM of the DAY:

Mindful

 

Every day
I see or hear
something
that more or less

kills me

with delight,

that leaves me

like a needle

in the haystack

of light.

It was what I was born for —

to look, to listen,

to lose myself

inside this soft world —

to instruct myself

over and over

in joy,

and acclamation.

Nor am I talking

about the exceptional,

the fearful, the dreadful,

the very extravagant —

but of the ordinary,

the common, the very drab,

the daily presentations.

Oh, good scholar,

I say to myself,

how can you help

but grow wise

with such teachings

as these —

the untrimmable light

of the world,
the ocean’s shine,
the prayers that are made
out of grass?

— from Why I Wake Early, by Mary Oliver

 

PRAYER OF THE DAY by the SAINT OF THE DAY:

 Eternal Light, shine in our hearts;

Eternal Goodness, deliver us from evil;

Eternal Power, be our support;

Eternal Wisdom, scatter the darkness of our ignorance;

Eternal Pity, have mercy upon us;

that with all our heart and mind and soul and strength

we may seek your face

and be brought by your infinite mercy to your holy presence

through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

— Alcuin of York (c. 735–804)

 

MYSTIC MORSELS for MEDITATION and PRAYER:

Patient waiting is necessary that we may fulfill what we have begun to be and, through God’s help, that we may obtain what we hope for and believe.

–Saint Cyprian of Carthage (c. 200-258)

 

Patience, patience, patience is what the sea teaches. One should lie empty, open, choice-less as a beach – waiting for a gift from the sea.

–Anne Morrow Lindbergh (1906-2001)

 

THE REST of the STORY:
Those little pockets found inside the right front pocket in Levi’s weren’t made for loose change.  When jeans were introduced it seems that at lot of men had pocket watches.  It was more convent to carry a watch in this small pocket rather than one in a vest.

Levi Strauss did not introduce zippers to blue jeans until 1947.  It seems that the company believed women did not wear jeans because of the button fly might become undone unbeknownst to them.

According to mentalfloss.com “In 1951, Bing Crosby made the egregious error of trying to don denim in a swanky Vancouver hotel. Unimpressed with his casual dress, the hotel almost denied him entry— until someone realized that the dude in denim was the world-famous crooner. Levi’s heard about the tale and made Crosby an entire tuxedo from his favorite fabric—501 denim.”

 

♦️🟦🟩🟧🟥🟪🟦🟩🟧🟥🟪  ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ 🟪🟥🟧🟩🟦🟪🟥🟧🟩🟦♦️

 

Due to proper social distancing people are having to wait longer in checkout lines in stores and to receive Holy Communion during Sunday Masses with only one line, instead of two or more. That reminds me ….

 

A priest, a doctor, and an engineer were waiting one morning for a particularly slow group of golfers. The engineer fumed, “What’s with those guys? We must have been waiting for fifteen minutes!” The doctor chimed in, “I don’t know, but I’ve never seen such inept golf!” The priest said, “Here comes the green-keeper. Let’s have a word with him.”

 

He said, “Hello George, what’s wrong with that group ahead of us? They’re rather slow, aren’t they?” The green-keeper replied, “Oh, yes. That’s a group of blind firemen. They lost their sight saving our clubhouse from a fire last year, so we always let them play for free anytime.”

 

The group fell silent for a moment.

 

The priest said, “That’s so sad. I think I will say a special prayer for them tonight.” The doctor said, “Good idea. I’m going to contact my ophthalmologist colleague and see if there’s anything he can do for them.” The engineer said, “Why can’t they play at night?”

 

♦️🟦🟩🟧🟥🟪🟦🟩🟧🟥🟪  ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ 🟪🟥🟧🟩🟦🟪🟥🟧🟩🟦♦️

 

A friend stopped with a strange look in his eyes.  This unannounced visit smelt fishy to me.  He had a tall tale to tell.  “I took my wife fishing yesterday and she wandered off. I thought I lobster, but then I flounder. Thank Cod. When we went to bed that night, she said, ‘Not tonight, dear, I have a haddock.”

 

Now fish puns have me hooked, even though really good ones make me eel. I need some new sofishticated puns.  I haven’t found any yet, guess I need to mullet over.  I am trying hard, but I am floundering.   I can’t even get to first bass.  Maybe I’ve been herring on the side of caution.  I’ll try to mussel one up for you. A reel good one.

 

Holy Mackarel, I’m not being koi here. Don’t be shellfish.

If you find any good fish puns, let minnow.